Testimony Num : 4

Every night dozens of people would infiltrate

border, from the southern Gaza Strip to the Nitzana area, where there was no fence yet
and every night tens of infiltrators were crossing the border to Israel.
I remember it very well because every night – we would not sleep.
Every night wewould wait for the “Sudanese”, that how we called them. I do not know how many
people know, but 90 percent of those who infiltrate into Israel are not Sudanese, they
are not people from war and danger, they are Africans from all kinds of countries, the
Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Eritrea, which countries you do not think of from Africa, come
with one goal – to find a job in Israel because they heard that the State of Israel has an
open border with Egypt and it’s very easy to get in and get a job. It is very important
to note that people from Sudan are poor and they fled from a combat zone … Very few
Infiltrators actually came from the war zone in Sudan into the territory of the State of
Israel.
So as I said, there was no fence at the time, now there is a fence. Every night dozens of
people would infiltrate.
The absurd thing is that if the Egyptians caught them, they would slaughter them. They
would shoot them and kill them, they would take the women, and I saw it with my eyes,
they would drag the women to their bases and they would become sex slaves there.
They would kill the man with gun shots and I saw it with my own eyes, that’s why
these guys from Africa were waiting for the night, to run and cross the 30 centimeters
“fence” that was there.
Of course, when they crossed the border they would be greeted with open hands and
get immediate medical treatment! We had to get to the area where the immigrants
infiltrated from Africa.

We would examine them from head to toe and we would treat any wound they might
have had from the fence. A kind of very warm welcome where on the other side, if they
were caught, we would see them being slaughtered before our eyes, ten meters from
us.
There’s something that always echoes in my head, when you join the army you think
you’re coming to take care of soldiers … In the end, you find yourself dealing with
civilians from foreign countries and disinfecting their leg wounds. Then you lead them
to the base, give them hot meals, give them a place to sleep, there was no arrangement at
the time, it was only at the beginning of the mass infiltration period. It is very inscribed
in my memory that we would arrive every night and treat everyone – from children to
the wounded… There was always medical staff nearby to care and make them feel as
good as possible, of course with a doctor if one was needed…

Staff Sergeant (res.,) Ron Leibengrov